Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Treatment Integrates Cardiac Stem Cells.

Initial trials of stem cell treatment for hypoplastic left heart syndrome have proven to be both safe and effective for children with the congenital defect.

Researchers from Okayama University have developed a method to treat the congenital heart defect known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS] by utilizing a specialized cardiac stem cell.  In a Phase I clinical trial conducted on children suffering from HLHS, the scientists concluded that, because the young stem cells in children are more abundant and self-renewing than those in adults, intracoronary injection of stem cells is a safe and feasible approach to treating the condition. Continue reading

Stem Cells With a Heart of Gold.

Scientists use gold nanoparticles to improve stem cell transplants for heart disease patients.

A team of bioengineers from Tel Aviv University is currently developing a scaffold to help regenerate heart muscle through the use of autologous stem cells.  The scientists, led by Dr. Tal Dvir, aim to replace damaged cardiac tissue in heart attack patients by creating a scaffold out of collagen and gold nanoparticles, and then infusing it with the patient’s own stem cells to stimulate the rejuvenation of cardiomyocytes. Continue reading

Pulmonary Valve for Children Engineered from Stem Cells.

An organic pulmonary valve replacement for children has been engineered with stem cells to grow as the child does to prevent multiple surgeries.

Researchers at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine have created a pulmonary valve replacement for pediatric patients suffering from congenital heart conditions.  The scientists, led by Dr. David L. Simpson, differentiated the patient’s own [autologous] stem cells into heart valvular cells and then arranged these cells to bioengineer a pulmonary valve that was unique to each patient.  The valve was created in vitro [outside the body] so the next step would be to develop protocols to undertake clinical trials.   Continue reading

Barth Syndrome Studied Utilizing “Organ-On-A-Chip” Technology and Autologous Stem Cells.

Scientists have generated heart tissue on a chip to better study Barth Syndrome.

A team of scientists from the Wyss Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Harvard’s Medical School, Stem Cell Institute, and School of Engineering has created a model to study and develop treatments for the genetic heart disorder Barth Syndrome by utilizing a patient’s own stem cells in conjunction with an organ-on-a-chip.  The chip was outfitted with proteins to mimic the cellular environment of the heart, causing the patient’s stem cells to differentiate into diseased heart tissue.  The tissue was then studied to not only determine the cause of the disease, but to treat the diseased tissue as well. Continue reading

Autologous Stem Cells Used to Reverse Heart Damage

By using the patient’s own stem cells, Scientists have found a way to regenerate heart muscle tissue.

Utilizing autologous [the patient’s own]stem cells to regenerate heart muscle, scientists at the Novant Health Group have successfully treated patients that suffered from severe heart attacks; potentially limiting the long term loss of tissue and preserving heart function for victims.  The patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells [the same type as dental stem cells] are harvested and then implanted back into the damaged area, where they recruit surrounding cells to aid in the repair process. Continue reading

The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now – Creating Organs With Your Own Stem Cells

Dr. Seifalian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers all around the world are working towards utilizing stem cells to grow replacement organs. While once thought to be a futuristic concept, it is now very real. Doctors and researchers have successfully transplanted lab grown bladders, blood vessels, tear ducts, arteries and windpipes. Now, research teams around the world are growing urethras, bile ducts, larynxes, bones, livers, kidneys, and even hearts.

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Mesoblast to Enter Phase III Clinical Trial for Heart Failure Stem Cell Treatment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesoblast, a leading stem cell technology and regenerative therapeutics company, received FDA approval to begin a Phase III clinical trial utilizing their stem cell therapy [Revascor] to treat heart failure.  We have reported on Mesoblast in previous posts; most recently, the announcement that they were developing neural related regenerative therapies utilizing dental pulp stem cells.

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