An Eye for a Tooth: Corneal Blindness Treatment Advances With The Use Of Dental Stem Cells.

Dental Stem Cells may hold the potential to cure corneal blindness.

Ophthalmologists James L Funderburgh, Ph.D. and Fatima Syed-Picard, Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh have devised a method for treating corneal blindness by utilizing dental pulp stem cells.  The researchers harvested the stem cells from molars discarded during routine extraction and induced the cells to differentiate into keratocytes [corneal cells].  They then seeded the cells onto a nanofiber scaffold, allowing them to grow into fully developed, functional corneas capable of restoring eyesight.    Continue reading

Inflammatory Disease Healed with Stem Cells

Stem cells located in the gums have the ability to regulate inflammatory conditions.

A research team led by Dr. Songtao Shi from the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC has discovered that mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] found in the gums are able to regulate the body’s immune system to treat inflammatory diseases.  In an animal model suffering from colitis [an inflamed condition of the colon], the scientists were able to transplant these gingival MSCs, significantly reducing the inflammation. Continue reading

A Sight for Sore Eyes – Stem Cells Discovered on Surface of Retina.

Scientists may one day be able to treat AMD with stem cells from the retina.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Lotery at Southampton General Hospital have discovered a source of retinal stem cells on the surface of the eye.  If scientists can harvest these readily accessible stem cells, convert them to light-sensitive cells, and then transplant them back into the eye, the cells could provide new treatments for age-related macular degeneration [AMD].

Currently, AMD is the leading cause for blindness in patients over the age of 50, and there is no known cure. However, the discovery of stem cells on the retina could facilitate a new method for scientists to replenish the light-sensitive cells in a patient’s eyes without the risk of rejection by the immune system, presenting a new potential treatment for the disease.

Although AMD tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

To view the full article, click here.

 

 

The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.

Brain Tumor Chemotherapy Delivered via Stem Cells.

Scientists hope to use stem cells to minimize collateral damage from brain tumor chemotherapy treatments.

Neuroscientist Dr. Karen Aboody, M.D. and Oncologist Dr. Jana Portnow, M.D. from City of Hope Hospital are set to begin a phase 1 clinical trial for a method of delivering chemotherapy treatments to glioblastoma [aggressive brain tumors] with modified neural stem cells.  The scientists plan to capitalize on the stem cells’ innate ability to seek out invasive tumors by loading the cells with a chemotherapeutic protein and then injecting them into the brain. Continue reading

Stem Cell Awareness Day 2014

The California Institute of Regenerative Medicine has coordinated Stem Cell Awareness day to highlight all of the progress that stem cells already made for patients around the world.

Today, stem cells are rightfully perceived as the future of regenerative medicine, set to bring the marvels of science fiction into reality.  But in looking ahead at all of the promise that stem cells hold for the future, it becomes easy to miss the scientific advances made to date for the millions of people around the world suffering from disease, trauma, and injury.  Thus, today marks Stem Cell Awareness Day: a global celebration of stem cell research coordinated to highlight the treatments and therapies currently in development to create personalized regenerative therapies for patients. Continue reading

Stem Cells Make a ‘Dentin’ Tooth Decay.

Researchers have utilized low-intensity lasers to regenerate lost dentin in damaged teeth.

Researchers at the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research have developed a method of utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] dental stem cells to regenerate damaged or decayed teeth.  In an animal model, as well as human cells in vitro [in a lab], the scientists treated the damaged teeth with low-intensity lasers, which prompted the stem cells located in the dental pulp to differentiate and grow into new, healthy dentin tissue. Continue reading

Bone Reconstruction Technique Utilizes Autologous Stem Cells

Stem cells are allowing doctors to personalize treatments to repair damaged or diseased bone.

A team of medical researchers at Saint Luc University Clinic have developed a method of repairing bones utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells.  The process involves harvesting the stem cells from the patient, differentiating the stem cells in-vitro to grow bone, pairing the cells with a scaffolding matrix and then molding the material to repair damaged or diseased bone within the patient. Continue reading

Columbia University Advances Stem Cell Based Approach to Repairing a Torn ACL

Stem cells could be used to expedite the healing process of a torn ACL

Researchers in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Columbia University have developed a methodology utilizing mesenchymal stem cells [the type of stem cells found in teeth] to engineer fibroblast tissue in the ACL. The stem cells were treated with both chemical growth factors and mechanical factors [scaffolding and mechanical stimuli], which enhanced the regeneration of connective tissue. Continue reading

Science Channel Program ‘Futurescape’ Reports on Stem Cells and Life Extension

The Science Channel explores the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine

As seen on the Science Channel’s “Futurescape” program, the host of the program, James Woods takes viewers on a journey of discovery as he explores the field of regenerative medicine and life extension.   The program examines current and future applications of stem cells to grow organs and tissue to treat disease, trauma and injury as well as efforts to increase life expectancy and mitigate the effects of aging. Continue reading

Advances in Stem Cell Therapy for Down Syndrome

little girl with down syndrome missing teeth

Researchers at UMass Medical School use human stem cells to ‘shut down’ the chromosomes causing Down syndrome. The lead researcher, Jeanne B. Lawrence, a professor of cell and developmental biology at UMass Medical School, explained, “Our hope is that for individuals living with Down syndrome, this proof-of-principal opens up multiple exciting new avenues for studying the disorder now, and brings into the realm of consideration research on the concept of ‘chromosome therapy’ in the future”. The treatment seeks to address the root cause of the disease as opposed to merely mitigating the symptoms of the disease.

Continue reading