Atherosclerotic Lesions Prevented by MSCs

Stem cells were found to reduce plaque in patients with atherosclerosis.

According to new research from the National Yang-Ming University, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] hold the ability to limit atherosclerotic plaque formation, thereby preventing the onset of harmful endothelial lesions. The research team, led by Shih-Chieh Hung, transplanted MSCs into animal models with atherosclerosis and observed significant reduction in plaque formation. They also saw an increase in blood vessel dilation, which prevents further plaque development, indicating good endothelial health. Continue reading

Feeling the Burn: Fat Loss Therapy Utilizes Stem Cells.

Scientists have identified two stimulants that induce stem cells to mature into brown fat cells instead of unhealthy white fat cells.

According to a recent study conducted by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, stem cells may hold the key to replacing the body’s unwanted storage of white fat cells with calorie-burning brown fat cells. The researchers studied the stem cells that typically mature into white fat cells, and, after screening the effects of 1000 compounds on the cells, they found two that stimulate the stem cells to differentiate into brown fat cells instead.  Continue reading

Low Blood Cell Counts Could Be Treated by Regulating Stem Cells.

Megakaryotes may hold the ability to regulate the amount of blood that stem cells produce.

According to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, hematopoietic stem cells [stem cells that produce blood] are directly regulated by megakaryocytes, the blood cells responsible for healing wounds.  The researchers found that megakaryotes produce two growth factors; one that signals for hematopoietic stem cells to proliferate, and one that keeps them in an inactive state.  This relationship controls the amount of blood being produced in the body. Continue reading

Male Infertility Research Identifies Sperm-Producing Stem Cells.

A new method of identifying sperm-producing stem cells could lead to stem cell treatments for male sterility.

In a recent study conducted by the University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, scientists have discovered a rare line of stem cells involved in regulating spermatogenesis [the production of sperm cells].  Furthermore, these stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which are toxic to the male germline and common causes for male infertility. Continue reading

Singing the Praises of Stem Cell Research

Stem Cells in white crown sparrows used to study neurodegenerative diseases.

A research team from the University of Washington has discovered a stem cell signal in Gambel’s white-crown sparrows that may lead to new regenerative treatments for patient suffering from neurodegenerative diseases.  The team found that, in preparation for an upcoming mating season, the sparrow’s brain cells release a chemical signal that activates the division of neural stem cells, which facilitate peak singing performance to attract mates. Continue reading

Stem Cell Awareness Day 2014

The California Institute of Regenerative Medicine has coordinated Stem Cell Awareness day to highlight all of the progress that stem cells already made for patients around the world.

Today, stem cells are rightfully perceived as the future of regenerative medicine, set to bring the marvels of science fiction into reality.  But in looking ahead at all of the promise that stem cells hold for the future, it becomes easy to miss the scientific advances made to date for the millions of people around the world suffering from disease, trauma, and injury.  Thus, today marks Stem Cell Awareness Day: a global celebration of stem cell research coordinated to highlight the treatments and therapies currently in development to create personalized regenerative therapies for patients. Continue reading

Muscle Degeneration Halted by Stem Cell Activation

A protein involved in muscle regeneration may be integral in activating stem cell-mediated muscle repair.

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical research institute have developed a potential method of regenerating autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to repair damaged muscle tissue in patients suffering from muscle-degenerative diseases.  The scientists found that the inhibition of protein STAT3 results in the replenishment of the body’s muscle stem cells, which in turn repair the muscles that are damaged by age, cancer, and diseases such as muscular dystrophy. Continue reading

Stem Cells Immune to Damage from Leukemia Chemotherapy

Certain stem cells have been found to be immune to the bone-degenerative side effects of chemotherapy used against leukemia.

A research team, led by Dr. Eric Darling of Brown University, has found a potential source of stem cells to protect children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia against the adverse effects of the chemotherapy drug methotrexate (MTX).  Adipose-derived stem cells, which appear to be impervious to the bone-degenerative side effects of MTX, may allow children to undergo the chemotherapy treatment and then regain the lost bone tissue afterwards. Continue reading

Retinal Tissue Created from Stem Cells.

Scientists have created light-sensitive retinal tissue from human stem cells.

A team of researchers from John Hopkins University of Medicine have developed miniature human retinal tissue in vitro with the ability to detect light. The scientists, led by Assistant Professor M. Valena Canto-Soler, constructed a 3D model of the retinal tissue containing photoreceptor stem cells that form light sensitive tissue in the back of the eye. Continue reading

Stem Cells Make a ‘Dentin’ Tooth Decay.

Researchers have utilized low-intensity lasers to regenerate lost dentin in damaged teeth.

Researchers at the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research have developed a method of utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] dental stem cells to regenerate damaged or decayed teeth.  In an animal model, as well as human cells in vitro [in a lab], the scientists treated the damaged teeth with low-intensity lasers, which prompted the stem cells located in the dental pulp to differentiate and grow into new, healthy dentin tissue. Continue reading