Bone Regeneration Made Possible With Stem Cells

Epibone creates precisely measured scaffolding for stem cells to recreate damaged bone.

The New York-based startup Epibone intends to begin human testing on a procedure that will utilize stem cells to regenerate living bone tissue.  The researchers, originally from Columbia University, will apply autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to nanofiber scaffolding of the desired size and shape and direct the stem cells to differentiate into a physical and genetic replica of the patient’s own bone. Continue reading

Game, Set, Match: Tennis Elbow Gets Aced by Stem Cell Therapy

In a new pilot study at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in London, researchers will utilize stem cells to promote the healing of painful tendon injuries such as tennis elbow.  Initial studies suggest that, upon transplantation, the stem cells release growth factors to the point of injury, which induce the growth of new tendon tissue while reducing scar tissue to recover movement and flexibility. Continue reading

New York Times: The Eruption of Stem Cell Therapies.

Mr. Edgar Irastorza is one of thousands of people already benefiting from the progression of stem cell based therapies.

As reported on the front page of the New York Times Science section, clinical applications of stem cell based therapies are accelerating at a rate that will revolutionize the medical field in a matter of years.  In the United States alone, there are currently over 4000 therapies in clinical trials for the treatment of heart disease, blindness, spinal cord injuries, diabetes, H.I.V., and other diseases, injuries, and traumas. Continue reading

Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Treatment in Clinical Trial

The transplantation of stem cells into areas affected by osteoarthritis allow lost cartilage tissue to regenerate.

In recent clinical trials, researchers at the National University of Ireland Galway have successfully utilized adult stem cells to treat patients with osteoarthritis.  The treatment involves recovering the patients’ own [autologous] stem cells and then injecting the stem cells into cartilage to stimulate the regeneration of lost tissue. Continue reading

Anti-Aging Properties of MSCs

Mesenchymal Stem Cells are able to stimulate muscle-building cells that lose function with age.

A recently published study by University of Illinois Kinesiology and Community Health Professor Marni Boppart has identified mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] as a tool for rejuvenating muscle to prevent age-related injuries and disabilities.  In addition to their ability to differentiate into other cell types, MSCs were found to secrete growth factors that stimulate the activation of the multiple cell types comprising skeletal muscle, including muscle precursor cells and satellite cells, which lose function with age. Continue reading

Hip Replacement Procedure Utilizes Autologous Stem Cells.

Scientists have utilized stem cells to aid in artificial hip replacement.

Doctors and Scientist at the Southampton General Hospital have successfully completed a hip transplant by using a titanium socket and a bone scaffold loaded with skeletal stem cells. The team, led by orthopedic surgeon Douglas Dunlap, 3D printed the titanium implant, and then added the bone graft filled with stem cells to the pelvis to encourage bone regrowth behind and around the metal replacement. Continue reading

Athletes Utilizing Their Own Stem Cells to Treat Injuries.

Surgeons utilizing the patient’s own stem cells could significantly reduce rehabilitation times for injured athletes.

Orthopedic Surgeons are utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to treat injuries and degenerative diseases in the joints and bones of athletes.  The treatments involve the recovery of the patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells – which are particularly plastic and can differentiate into a variety of tissue types and implanting them back into the damaged bone or joint to reduce inflammation and regenerate damaged tissue without the need for invasive surgery.  Continue reading

Researchers Utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cells [MCS] to Generate Cartilage Formation

 knee cartilage regenerated by mesenchymal stem cells

Knee cartilage

 

 

 

 

 

Cartilage injuries can range from small lesions, such as those of athletes, to chronic injuries, such as cartilage degradation. Cartilage injuries, which are difficult to repair and have limited options for surgery, and usually results in a drastic affect on quality of life of afflicted individuals.  In addition, the health, number and vitality of cartilage cells diminish with age.

Continue reading