Atherosclerotic Lesions Prevented by MSCs

Stem cells were found to reduce plaque in patients with atherosclerosis.

According to new research from the National Yang-Ming University, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] hold the ability to limit atherosclerotic plaque formation, thereby preventing the onset of harmful endothelial lesions. The research team, led by Shih-Chieh Hung, transplanted MSCs into animal models with atherosclerosis and observed significant reduction in plaque formation. They also saw an increase in blood vessel dilation, which prevents further plaque development, indicating good endothelial health. Continue reading

Low Blood Cell Counts Could Be Treated by Regulating Stem Cells.

Megakaryotes may hold the ability to regulate the amount of blood that stem cells produce.

According to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, hematopoietic stem cells [stem cells that produce blood] are directly regulated by megakaryocytes, the blood cells responsible for healing wounds.  The researchers found that megakaryotes produce two growth factors; one that signals for hematopoietic stem cells to proliferate, and one that keeps them in an inactive state.  This relationship controls the amount of blood being produced in the body. Continue reading

Peripheral Artery Disease Treatment Utilizes Stem Cells

Scientists have devised a method of regenerating blood vessels by transplanting stem cells.

Researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine have developed a potential therapy for peripheral artery disease by transplanting autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells.  In an animal model, the transplanted stem cells differentiated into new blood vessels, which then restored blood flow to damaged tissues in the body. Continue reading

Blood Cells Generated by Modified Stem Cell Differentiation

Researchers have identified two transcription factors that induce stem cells to differentiate into blood cells.

A research group led by Dr. Igor Slukvin, MD PHD, from University of Wisconsin-Madison has identified two transcription factors responsible for the differentiation of stem cells into numerous types of white and red blood cells.  The team made use of messenger RNA to overexpress the two transcription factors, which allowed them to generate 30 million blood cells for every million stem cells, without the use of a virus or altering the genetic structure of the blood. Continue reading

New York Times: The Eruption of Stem Cell Therapies.

Mr. Edgar Irastorza is one of thousands of people already benefiting from the progression of stem cell based therapies.

As reported on the front page of the New York Times Science section, clinical applications of stem cell based therapies are accelerating at a rate that will revolutionize the medical field in a matter of years.  In the United States alone, there are currently over 4000 therapies in clinical trials for the treatment of heart disease, blindness, spinal cord injuries, diabetes, H.I.V., and other diseases, injuries, and traumas. Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Advance Utilizes Mesenchymal Stem Cells

The transplantation of adult stem cells into a Type-1 Diabetes animal model has revealed the importance of blood vessels in pancreatic beta cell regeneration.

Researchers led by Dr. Habib Zaghouani from the University of Missouri have developed a potential cure to Type 1 Diabetes by utilizing mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs].  Although researchers anticipated that the MSCs would differentiate into new insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, they discovered that the stem cells fulfilled the more critical function of repairing damaged blood vessels, which in turn facilitated the regeneration of insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the distribution of insulin across the body. Continue reading

Improving the Efficacy of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

The protein SIRT1 maintains the regenerative abilities of hematopoietic stem cells.

A research team from Mount Sinai, Harvard Medical School, and Children’s Hospital in Boston has determined the function of protein Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) in maintaining the regenerative ability of blood stem cells.  The researchers found that young stem cells lacking SIRT1 exhibited a similar deficiency in rejuvenating blood as observed in older stem cells.  These older, defunct blood stem cells are unable to refresh the body’s blood supply, resulting in vulnerability to age-related cancers and immune diseases. Continue reading

Stem Cells Immune to Damage from Leukemia Chemotherapy

Certain stem cells have been found to be immune to the bone-degenerative side effects of chemotherapy used against leukemia.

A research team, led by Dr. Eric Darling of Brown University, has found a potential source of stem cells to protect children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia against the adverse effects of the chemotherapy drug methotrexate (MTX).  Adipose-derived stem cells, which appear to be impervious to the bone-degenerative side effects of MTX, may allow children to undergo the chemotherapy treatment and then regain the lost bone tissue afterwards. Continue reading

Sickle Cell Disease Treated with Stem Cells

Patients with sickle cell anemia have utilized stem cells from their siblings to treat the disease.

Researchers led by Matthew Hsieh of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have reversed sickle cell disease in adults by utilizing stem cells from the patients’ siblings.  The patients received a transplant that combined their own stem cells with those of a sibling, resulting in an increase in lung function and a decrease in the patients’ sickle cell count, as well as their dependency on immunosuppressant and pain relieving drugs. Continue reading

Growing Organs With Your Own Stem Cells

stemcellnose

A research team led by Doctor Alexander Seifalian at University College London is currently creating custom lab-grown organs and body parts for patients utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells.  The scientists have engineered a polymer material that they mold into the shape of an organ in need, infuse with the patient’s stem cells, and then transplant back onto the patient’s body.   Continue reading