In with a BAM – Stem Cells Advance Bladder Regeneration

The bladder acellular matrix is a housing of connective tissue that provides structural support for the functional cells of the bladder

New research from McGill University has shown that the bladder acellular matrix [BAM], or the external structure of connective tissue and growth factors that house the cellular components of the bladder, can serve as a scaffolding unit for mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] to regenerate healthy bladder tissue.  The stem cells receive growth factors from the BAM, which direct them to differentiate into new bladder cells that, when transplanted into an animal model, exhibit nearly 100% normal bladder capacity and function. Continue reading

Lupus Therapy Incorporates Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Beijing researchers are capitalizing on the abilities of mesenchymal stem cells to reduce inflammation and promote cell growth to combat systemic lupus erythematosus.

In a recent clinical study conducted in Beijing, researchers are testing a treatment for patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus by administering autologous [the patient’s own] mesenchymal stem cells.  The researchers aim to capitalize on the unique abilities of MSCs to not only differentiate into a multitude of different cell types, but to reduce the autoimmune attack in patients affected by lupus as well. Continue reading

Growing Organs With Your Own Stem Cells

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A research team led by Doctor Alexander Seifalian at University College London is currently creating custom lab-grown organs and body parts for patients utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells.  The scientists have engineered a polymer material that they mold into the shape of an organ in need, infuse with the patient’s stem cells, and then transplant back onto the patient’s body.   Continue reading

The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now – Creating Organs With Your Own Stem Cells

Dr. Seifalian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers all around the world are working towards utilizing stem cells to grow replacement organs. While once thought to be a futuristic concept, it is now very real. Doctors and researchers have successfully transplanted lab grown bladders, blood vessels, tear ducts, arteries and windpipes. Now, research teams around the world are growing urethras, bile ducts, larynxes, bones, livers, kidneys, and even hearts.

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Wake Forest Study Provides Insights into Organ Regeneration for Humans


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Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine reported their findings in an animal study in which rats were able to re-grow their bladders in as little as 8 weeks. The focus of the study was to better understand the regenerative process at work in the re-growth of the bladder.

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