Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Treatment Integrates Cardiac Stem Cells.

Initial trials of stem cell treatment for hypoplastic left heart syndrome have proven to be both safe and effective for children with the congenital defect.

Researchers from Okayama University have developed a method to treat the congenital heart defect known as hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS] by utilizing a specialized cardiac stem cell.  In a Phase I clinical trial conducted on children suffering from HLHS, the scientists concluded that, because the young stem cells in children are more abundant and self-renewing than those in adults, intracoronary injection of stem cells is a safe and feasible approach to treating the condition. Continue reading

Muscular Dystrophy-Induced Heart Failure Averted by Stem Cells.

Although duchenne muscle dystrophy affects the entire body, often the cause of death for DMD patients is heart failure.

Researchers led by Eduardo Marbón of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have developed a method to prolong the lives of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy [DMD] through the infusion of cardiac stem cells.  The stem cells reverse the loss of cardiac muscle caused by the genetic disease, preventing heart failure that would otherwise limit a patient’s life expectancy to age 25. Continue reading

Feeling the Burn: Fat Loss Therapy Utilizes Stem Cells.

Scientists have identified two stimulants that induce stem cells to mature into brown fat cells instead of unhealthy white fat cells.

According to a recent study conducted by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, stem cells may hold the key to replacing the body’s unwanted storage of white fat cells with calorie-burning brown fat cells. The researchers studied the stem cells that typically mature into white fat cells, and, after screening the effects of 1000 compounds on the cells, they found two that stimulate the stem cells to differentiate into brown fat cells instead.  Continue reading

Stem Cells With a Heart of Gold.

Scientists use gold nanoparticles to improve stem cell transplants for heart disease patients.

A team of bioengineers from Tel Aviv University is currently developing a scaffold to help regenerate heart muscle through the use of autologous stem cells.  The scientists, led by Dr. Tal Dvir, aim to replace damaged cardiac tissue in heart attack patients by creating a scaffold out of collagen and gold nanoparticles, and then infusing it with the patient’s own stem cells to stimulate the rejuvenation of cardiomyocytes. Continue reading

Pulmonary Valve for Children Engineered from Stem Cells.

An organic pulmonary valve replacement for children has been engineered with stem cells to grow as the child does to prevent multiple surgeries.

Researchers at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine have created a pulmonary valve replacement for pediatric patients suffering from congenital heart conditions.  The scientists, led by Dr. David L. Simpson, differentiated the patient’s own [autologous] stem cells into heart valvular cells and then arranged these cells to bioengineer a pulmonary valve that was unique to each patient.  The valve was created in vitro [outside the body] so the next step would be to develop protocols to undertake clinical trials.   Continue reading

Barth Syndrome Studied Utilizing “Organ-On-A-Chip” Technology and Autologous Stem Cells.

Scientists have generated heart tissue on a chip to better study Barth Syndrome.

A team of scientists from the Wyss Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Harvard’s Medical School, Stem Cell Institute, and School of Engineering has created a model to study and develop treatments for the genetic heart disorder Barth Syndrome by utilizing a patient’s own stem cells in conjunction with an organ-on-a-chip.  The chip was outfitted with proteins to mimic the cellular environment of the heart, causing the patient’s stem cells to differentiate into diseased heart tissue.  The tissue was then studied to not only determine the cause of the disease, but to treat the diseased tissue as well. Continue reading

Heart Failure Treatment Utilizing Stem Cells.

Columbia researchers have developed a scaffold that will allow stem cells to repair heart damage.

A team of researchers led by Dr. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic [a member of StemSave’s Scientific Advisory Council has engineered a scaffold to facilitate the regeneration of heart muscle through the use of adult stem cells.  In an animal model, Vunjak-Novakovic and her team created a scaffold using biodegradable chitosan and carbon nanofibers, infusing it with stem cells to provoke the regeneration of beating cardiomyocytes. Continue reading

Heart Disease Treatment Utilizes Mesenchymal Stem Cells [MSCs]

Cell-Kro has the potential to rebuild damaged portions of the heart using the patient’s own stem cells.

Researchers from the University of Vermont have developed a novel and effective application of mesenchymal stem cells [the same type found in Dental Stem Cells] to treat heart disease. The MSCs, when transplanted along with cardiac stem cells into the heart [in an animal model], produced a “cocktail” of protective ligands that improved the grafting success of the cardiac stem cells. Continue reading

Autologous Stem Cells Used to Reverse Heart Damage

By using the patient’s own stem cells, Scientists have found a way to regenerate heart muscle tissue.

Utilizing autologous [the patient’s own]stem cells to regenerate heart muscle, scientists at the Novant Health Group have successfully treated patients that suffered from severe heart attacks; potentially limiting the long term loss of tissue and preserving heart function for victims.  The patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells [the same type as dental stem cells] are harvested and then implanted back into the damaged area, where they recruit surrounding cells to aid in the repair process. Continue reading

Treating Heart Attacks With Your Own Stem Cells

Stem Cells used in heart regeneration

Scientists have used stem cells to successfully regenerate heart tissue

Researchers Dr. Luis Gruberg and Dr. Allen Jeremias, from the Stony Brook Heart Institute and Intensive Care Unit, have conducted a clinical study utilizing the patient’s own stem cells to treat them after suffering a severe heart attack. The treatement, which involves infusing millions of autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells into the coronary artery, successfully regenerated damaged tissue in the heart. Continue reading