Bone Regeneration Made Possible With Stem Cells

Epibone creates precisely measured scaffolding for stem cells to recreate damaged bone.

The New York-based startup Epibone intends to begin human testing on a procedure that will utilize stem cells to regenerate living bone tissue.  The researchers, originally from Columbia University, will apply autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to nanofiber scaffolding of the desired size and shape and direct the stem cells to differentiate into a physical and genetic replica of the patient’s own bone. Continue reading

Bone Regeneration Technique Stimulates Stem Cells with Magnetic Nanoparticles.

Remote controlled nanoparticles may allow stem cells to regenerate bone tissue

Medical researchers from Keele University and Nottingham University have integrated remote controlled magnetic nanoparticles to incite the differentiation of stem cells into new bone tissue for the treatment of bone diseases, disorders, and injuries. In pre-clinical trials, the nanoparticles were coated with proteins that stimulate the stem cells, and then delivered directly to the damaged tissue via an external magnetic field. Continue reading

New York Times: The Eruption of Stem Cell Therapies.

Mr. Edgar Irastorza is one of thousands of people already benefiting from the progression of stem cell based therapies.

As reported on the front page of the New York Times Science section, clinical applications of stem cell based therapies are accelerating at a rate that will revolutionize the medical field in a matter of years.  In the United States alone, there are currently over 4000 therapies in clinical trials for the treatment of heart disease, blindness, spinal cord injuries, diabetes, H.I.V., and other diseases, injuries, and traumas. Continue reading

Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Treatment in Clinical Trial

The transplantation of stem cells into areas affected by osteoarthritis allow lost cartilage tissue to regenerate.

In recent clinical trials, researchers at the National University of Ireland Galway have successfully utilized adult stem cells to treat patients with osteoarthritis.  The treatment involves recovering the patients’ own [autologous] stem cells and then injecting the stem cells into cartilage to stimulate the regeneration of lost tissue. Continue reading

Stem Cells Immune to Damage from Leukemia Chemotherapy

Certain stem cells have been found to be immune to the bone-degenerative side effects of chemotherapy used against leukemia.

A research team, led by Dr. Eric Darling of Brown University, has found a potential source of stem cells to protect children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia against the adverse effects of the chemotherapy drug methotrexate (MTX).  Adipose-derived stem cells, which appear to be impervious to the bone-degenerative side effects of MTX, may allow children to undergo the chemotherapy treatment and then regain the lost bone tissue afterwards. Continue reading

Athletes Utilizing Their Own Stem Cells to Treat Injuries.

Surgeons utilizing the patient’s own stem cells could significantly reduce rehabilitation times for injured athletes.

Orthopedic Surgeons are utilizing autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to treat injuries and degenerative diseases in the joints and bones of athletes.  The treatments involve the recovery of the patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells – which are particularly plastic and can differentiate into a variety of tissue types and implanting them back into the damaged bone or joint to reduce inflammation and regenerate damaged tissue without the need for invasive surgery.  Continue reading

Dental Stem Cells Repair Jaw [Mandibular] Bone

Jaw-Pain

In a follow-up study, stem cells from teeth were found to provide a viable and stable repair mechanism for mandibular bone defects. Three years after the clinical trial was initiated, the bone is still functioning properly.

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Advance in Understanding of Stem Cells Could Lead to Therapies For Bone Loss

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Researchers at Georgia Reagents University, Medical College of Georgia have discovered a signaling molecule that helps stem cells to survive in a low-oxygen environment, such as inside the bone marrow.  This discovery is a significant advance in understanding the way stem cells works in their natural environment thus aiding researchers in the development of more effective therapies to combat bone loss as the world population ages.

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