Bone Regeneration Made Possible With Stem Cells

Epibone creates precisely measured scaffolding for stem cells to recreate damaged bone.

The New York-based startup Epibone intends to begin human testing on a procedure that will utilize stem cells to regenerate living bone tissue.  The researchers, originally from Columbia University, will apply autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to nanofiber scaffolding of the desired size and shape and direct the stem cells to differentiate into a physical and genetic replica of the patient’s own bone. Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed by Integrating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

MSCs and HCELL molecules track down islet cells and reverse inflammation.

According to a recently published study from the Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] have the ability to reverse type I diabetes by suppressing the auto-immune attack of islet cells.  Although the MSCs cannot be directly injected into the pancreas, the researchers utilized the surface adhesion molecule HCELL to hone the stem cells in on the inflamed islets, allowing them to normalize blood sugar levels without the use of insulin. Continue reading

Muscular Dystrophy-Induced Heart Failure Averted by Stem Cells.

Although duchenne muscle dystrophy affects the entire body, often the cause of death for DMD patients is heart failure.

Researchers led by Eduardo Marbón of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have developed a method to prolong the lives of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy [DMD] through the infusion of cardiac stem cells.  The stem cells reverse the loss of cardiac muscle caused by the genetic disease, preventing heart failure that would otherwise limit a patient’s life expectancy to age 25. Continue reading

A Sight for Sore Eyes – Stem Cells Discovered on Surface of Retina.

Scientists may one day be able to treat AMD with stem cells from the retina.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Lotery at Southampton General Hospital have discovered a source of retinal stem cells on the surface of the eye.  If scientists can harvest these readily accessible stem cells, convert them to light-sensitive cells, and then transplant them back into the eye, the cells could provide new treatments for age-related macular degeneration [AMD].

Currently, AMD is the leading cause for blindness in patients over the age of 50, and there is no known cure. However, the discovery of stem cells on the retina could facilitate a new method for scientists to replenish the light-sensitive cells in a patient’s eyes without the risk of rejection by the immune system, presenting a new potential treatment for the disease.

Although AMD tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

To view the full article, click here.

 

 

The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.

Stem Cells With a Heart of Gold.

Scientists use gold nanoparticles to improve stem cell transplants for heart disease patients.

A team of bioengineers from Tel Aviv University is currently developing a scaffold to help regenerate heart muscle through the use of autologous stem cells.  The scientists, led by Dr. Tal Dvir, aim to replace damaged cardiac tissue in heart attack patients by creating a scaffold out of collagen and gold nanoparticles, and then infusing it with the patient’s own stem cells to stimulate the rejuvenation of cardiomyocytes. Continue reading

Gel-Like Polymers May Improve Stem Cell-Based Therapies.

Scientists have created a polymer that may protect and stimulate stem cells during transplantation procedures.

Complex chemical polymers are currently being developed by scientists at Stanford University to protect and support the proliferation of stem cells during spinal cord transplantation procedures.  The gels are designed to provide padding for the cells during injection, while also varying in viscosity and the biochemical signals contained within to offer stem cells an optimal environment for differentiation. Continue reading

Pulmonary Valve for Children Engineered from Stem Cells.

An organic pulmonary valve replacement for children has been engineered with stem cells to grow as the child does to prevent multiple surgeries.

Researchers at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine have created a pulmonary valve replacement for pediatric patients suffering from congenital heart conditions.  The scientists, led by Dr. David L. Simpson, differentiated the patient’s own [autologous] stem cells into heart valvular cells and then arranged these cells to bioengineer a pulmonary valve that was unique to each patient.  The valve was created in vitro [outside the body] so the next step would be to develop protocols to undertake clinical trials.   Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Advance Utilizes Mesenchymal Stem Cells

The transplantation of adult stem cells into a Type-1 Diabetes animal model has revealed the importance of blood vessels in pancreatic beta cell regeneration.

Researchers led by Dr. Habib Zaghouani from the University of Missouri have developed a potential cure to Type 1 Diabetes by utilizing mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs].  Although researchers anticipated that the MSCs would differentiate into new insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, they discovered that the stem cells fulfilled the more critical function of repairing damaged blood vessels, which in turn facilitated the regeneration of insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the distribution of insulin across the body. Continue reading

Acute Stroke Treatment Utilizing the Patient’s Own Stem Cells

Autologous stem cell therapy has shown significant signs of recovery in acute stroke patients.

In a pilot study conducted by the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, five patients received transplants of their own [autologous] stem cells directly into their brains only seven days after a severe stroke. Although the trial was designed primarily to assess the safety of such a procedure, the patients showed significant signs of recovery considering the typical lethality of the strokes. Continue reading

Sickle Cell Disease Treated with Stem Cells

Patients with sickle cell anemia have utilized stem cells from their siblings to treat the disease.

Researchers led by Matthew Hsieh of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have reversed sickle cell disease in adults by utilizing stem cells from the patients’ siblings.  The patients received a transplant that combined their own stem cells with those of a sibling, resulting in an increase in lung function and a decrease in the patients’ sickle cell count, as well as their dependency on immunosuppressant and pain relieving drugs. Continue reading