Sniffing Out Parkinson’s Disease With Stem Cells

Stem Cells found in the nose produce neurons that may be able to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

German scientists at the University of Bielefeld and Dresden University of technology have produced neurons from inferior turbinate stem cells [ITSC], a cell type that is typically discarded during sinus surgery, as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease.  After transplanting the ITSCs into an animal model suffering from Parkinson’s, the researchers observed full functional restoration and significant behavioral recovery in the subjects without any adverse side effects.

Many medications and therapeutic devices are designed to combat the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, without treating the neurological cause of the disease.  Stem cells, on the other hand, have the ability to differentiate into neurons and migrate into the brain to directly regenerate the brain tissue destroyed by the disease.  Rather than helping patients live with Parkinson’s, stem cells may be closer to helping them live without it.

Although Parkinson’s disease tends to affect patients later on in life, the higher regenerative abilities of younger stem cells are preferable over older ones for medical therapies.  One way to assure access to the enhanced regenerative abilities of your own stem cells is to preserve them while they are still young, so that they can be used later in life in emerging regenerative therapies. Today, preserving your own stem cells, also known as autologous stem cells, is simple and affordable for families. To learn how you can preserve your own valuable stem cells through non-invasive and effective methods, please visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

To view the full article, click here.

 

 

The Future of Regenerative Medicine is Now™.