Sniffing Out Parkinson’s Disease With Stem Cells

Stem Cells found in the nose produce neurons that may be able to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

German scientists at the University of Bielefeld and Dresden University of technology have produced neurons from inferior turbinate stem cells [ITSC], a cell type that is typically discarded during sinus surgery, as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease.  After transplanting the ITSCs into an animal model suffering from Parkinson’s, the researchers observed full functional restoration and significant behavioral recovery in the subjects without any adverse side effects. Continue reading

Lung Regeneration Made Possible through Stem Cells.

Scientists have found a stem cell line that specializes in restoring lung tissue

Jackson Laboratory scientists have identified the adult lung stem cells p63+/Krt5+ as the specific cell line that specializes in lung regeneration.  In an animal model, professors Frank McKeon, Ph.D. and Wa Xian, Ph.D. observed as the p63+/Krt5+, which typically mature into the lungs’ alveoli, responded to lung damage caused by the H1N1 influenza virus by migrating to the sites of inflammation and restoring the lost tissue. Continue reading

Multiple Sclerosis Trial Exhibits Positive Results of Stem Cell Therapy.

A five year phase II clinical trial has shown initial success in treating multiple sclerosis.

In a recent update of an ongoing five year clinical trial conducted by the Chicago Blood Cancer Institute, patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis have experienced suppression of disease-related inflammation as a result of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations.  The stem cells have the ability to regulate the autoimmune attack on the central nervous system, and have provided 82.8% of the patients with two years thus far of event-free disease remission. Continue reading

In with a BAM – Stem Cells Advance Bladder Regeneration

The bladder acellular matrix is a housing of connective tissue that provides structural support for the functional cells of the bladder

New research from McGill University has shown that the bladder acellular matrix [BAM], or the external structure of connective tissue and growth factors that house the cellular components of the bladder, can serve as a scaffolding unit for mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] to regenerate healthy bladder tissue.  The stem cells receive growth factors from the BAM, which direct them to differentiate into new bladder cells that, when transplanted into an animal model, exhibit nearly 100% normal bladder capacity and function. Continue reading

Muscular Dystrophy-Induced Heart Failure Averted by Stem Cells.

Although duchenne muscle dystrophy affects the entire body, often the cause of death for DMD patients is heart failure.

Researchers led by Eduardo Marbón of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have developed a method to prolong the lives of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy [DMD] through the infusion of cardiac stem cells.  The stem cells reverse the loss of cardiac muscle caused by the genetic disease, preventing heart failure that would otherwise limit a patient’s life expectancy to age 25. Continue reading