Multiple Sclerosis Therapy Incorporates Stem Cells in Clinical Trial

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy has been deemed safe for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis.

A recent clinical trial conducted by the University of Genoa has determined that mesenchymal stem cell therapy to treat multiple sclerosis is indeed safe to perform on humans.  27 MS patients completed the study, which comprised an injection of the patient’s own [autologous] mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] to reduce excessive inflammation caused by the patients’ own immune systems. None of the patients suffered any side effects from the injection. Continue reading

Multiple Sclerosis Therapy Incorporates Stem Cells in Clinical Trial

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy has been deemed safe for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis.

A recent clinical trial conducted by the University of Genoa has determined that mesenchymal stem cell therapy to treat multiple sclerosis is indeed safe to perform on humans.  27 MS patients completed the study, which comprised an injection of the patient’s own [autologous] mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs] to reduce excessive inflammation caused by the patients’ own immune systems. None of the patients suffered any side effects from the injection. Continue reading

Pulmonary Valve for Children Engineered from Stem Cells.

An organic pulmonary valve replacement for children has been engineered with stem cells to grow as the child does to prevent multiple surgeries.

Researchers at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine have created a pulmonary valve replacement for pediatric patients suffering from congenital heart conditions.  The scientists, led by Dr. David L. Simpson, differentiated the patient’s own [autologous] stem cells into heart valvular cells and then arranged these cells to bioengineer a pulmonary valve that was unique to each patient.  The valve was created in vitro [outside the body] so the next step would be to develop protocols to undertake clinical trials.   Continue reading

Muscle Degeneration Halted by Stem Cell Activation

A protein involved in muscle regeneration may be integral in activating stem cell-mediated muscle repair.

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical research institute have developed a potential method of regenerating autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells to repair damaged muscle tissue in patients suffering from muscle-degenerative diseases.  The scientists found that the inhibition of protein STAT3 results in the replenishment of the body’s muscle stem cells, which in turn repair the muscles that are damaged by age, cancer, and diseases such as muscular dystrophy. Continue reading

ARDS Treatment Integrates Proteins from Stem Cells.

Scientists have utilized Mesenchymal Stem Cells to reduce inflammation in the lungs of ARDS patients.

A recent study presented at the European Respiratory Society’s International Congress has developed a possible treatment for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) by using Mesenchymal Stem Cells [MSC] to reduce inflammation in the lungs. In an animal model, stem cells released proteins that stimulate macrophages (a type of white blood cell) to suppress the excessive immune response that can severely damage a patient’s lungs. Continue reading

New York Times: The Eruption of Stem Cell Therapies.

Mr. Edgar Irastorza is one of thousands of people already benefiting from the progression of stem cell based therapies.

As reported on the front page of the New York Times Science section, clinical applications of stem cell based therapies are accelerating at a rate that will revolutionize the medical field in a matter of years.  In the United States alone, there are currently over 4000 therapies in clinical trials for the treatment of heart disease, blindness, spinal cord injuries, diabetes, H.I.V., and other diseases, injuries, and traumas. Continue reading

Osteoarthritis Stem Cell Treatment in Clinical Trial

The transplantation of stem cells into areas affected by osteoarthritis allow lost cartilage tissue to regenerate.

In recent clinical trials, researchers at the National University of Ireland Galway have successfully utilized adult stem cells to treat patients with osteoarthritis.  The treatment involves recovering the patients’ own [autologous] stem cells and then injecting the stem cells into cartilage to stimulate the regeneration of lost tissue. Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Advance Utilizes Mesenchymal Stem Cells

The transplantation of adult stem cells into a Type-1 Diabetes animal model has revealed the importance of blood vessels in pancreatic beta cell regeneration.

Researchers led by Dr. Habib Zaghouani from the University of Missouri have developed a potential cure to Type 1 Diabetes by utilizing mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs].  Although researchers anticipated that the MSCs would differentiate into new insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, they discovered that the stem cells fulfilled the more critical function of repairing damaged blood vessels, which in turn facilitated the regeneration of insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the distribution of insulin across the body. Continue reading

FSHD Study Utilizes Stem Cells

A new potential treatment for FSHD utilizes stem cells to regenerate the muscle lost to protein DUX4.

In a recently published study by the University of Minnesota, researchers are utilizing skeletal muscle stem cells in an animal model designed to study the muscle-degenerative protein DUX4 found in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy [FSHD]. The team was able to harvest the muscle stem cells from one mouse with FSHD and transplant them into a recipient mouse, allowing the recipient to regenerate new muscle as long as DUX4 was not activated. Continue reading

ALS Research Capitalizes on Stem Cells.

A recent Mt. Sinai study for ALS is set to enter phase one clinical trials.

Researchers at the Cedars-Mt. Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute, led by Dr. Robert H. Baloh, have devised a method to study and develop potential treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis [ALS] by utilizing patients’ stem cell-derived neurons.  In an example of what is referred to as translational genomics, researchers extract autologous (the patient’s own) stem cells, correct the defective gene causing the disease, and then, in a potential treatment protocol, transplant the cells back into the patient to reverse neural degeneration. Continue reading