Barth Syndrome Studied Utilizing “Organ-On-A-Chip” Technology and Autologous Stem Cells.

Scientists have generated heart tissue on a chip to better study Barth Syndrome.

A team of scientists from the Wyss Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Harvard’s Medical School, Stem Cell Institute, and School of Engineering has created a model to study and develop treatments for the genetic heart disorder Barth Syndrome by utilizing a patient’s own stem cells in conjunction with an organ-on-a-chip.  The chip was outfitted with proteins to mimic the cellular environment of the heart, causing the patient’s stem cells to differentiate into diseased heart tissue.  The tissue was then studied to not only determine the cause of the disease, but to treat the diseased tissue as well.

Prior to the work of principle investigators Dr. Kevin Parker and Dr. William Pu, Barth Syndrome was considered untreatable.  Now, this novel melding of autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells and organ-on-a-chip technology are providing a tissue based model to better understand and develop treatments for the genetic disorder.  According to Dr. Parker, “I feel that the technology that we’ve got arms industry and university-based researchers with the tools they need to go after this disease.”

Dr. Pu and Dr. Parker’s research is yet another example of how autologous [a patient’s own] stem cells are influencing the outcome of treatment options. To learn more about stem cells, and how families can bank their own valuable stem cells by recovering the very powerful dental pulp stem cells during routine dental procedures; such as wisdom teeth extractions or the during the loss of baby teeth, visit StemSave or call 877-783-6728 (877-StemSave) today.

 

 

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